The Great Trees,
The Redwood & Sequoia


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In California, there are 80,000 acres of old-growth Coast Redwood in parks,
and 7,000 acres of old-growth Coast Redwood in private lands.

Redwood is actually a special group that is made up of two distinct conifers:
California or coastal redwood and the giant sequoias.
Californian Redwood, Sequoia sempervirens, native to Northern California
and Southern Oregon where it attains a height of over 300 feet.
The General Sherman Sequoia in Sequoia National Park, for example,
averages 30.7 feet in diameter at its base
and 27.4 feet at a point 8 feet from the ground.

Unlike the great Sequoias of the Sierras
(Yosemite, Kings Canyon, and Sequoia National Parks),
Redwood lumber is durable and highly prized by timber companies,
and a much smaller percentage of these trees have survived the lumberman's saw.
They have a strong regenerative ability,
with a ring of trees able to sprout from the base
of a damaged giant and use the old, established root system.
If a fire is hot enough,
the fluids inside the tree explode, letting the fire in.
The young trees survive in a circle around the empty space left by the parent tree.

Today the only sequoia species left are the giant sequoia, Sequoiadendron gigantea,
aka S. gigantea, of the Sierra Nevada in central California,
and the very different coast Redwood,
along the coast of northern California and southern Oregon.
Together with a few Asian relatives and the Bald Cypresses of North America,
they are all that remain of the once much larger and more widespread Redwood Genus.
Sequoias are native in a restricted region
on the western slopes of the Sierra Nevada,
where it reaches a height of over 300 feet and girth of 90 feet.
Young growth giant sequoia has as good, if not better, wood qualities
of young-growth coast redwood and other lumber species grown in the same area.

The name Sequoia commemorates Sequoiah,
son of a British Trader and a Cherokee Woman,
who invented an alphabet for the Cherokee language.





  1. Background: Statistics on California's Redwoods
  2. Giant Sequoia
  3. Reforestation Project
    Thus, we were recommending planting giant Sequoia above 300 meters,
    coast redwood below 200 meters,
    and either or both between 200 and 300 meters elevation in France.
  4. Redwood
  5. Great Pictures
    Redwood National Park Giant Sequoia, Sequoia National Park.
  6. Grant Grove Visitor Center
  7. The Redwood Family
  8. Redwood National Park Redwood Trees
  9. Giant Sequoia
  10. Dawn Redwood, Metasequoia glyptostroboides
  11. Pacific Northwest Conifers
  12. Calaveras County Tree Farms
  13. Univ. of Exeter - Catalogue of Conifers
  14. Redwood Ecology
  15. Trees of the Pacific Northwest
    If it's green and it grows in Oregon, you can find it here.





FIRE MANAGEMENT ANALYSIS
FIRE MISMANAGEMENT
Mythical and Mystical Trees
Chilean Coastal Forests, Alerce Pines
Forest Women
Agricultural Perspectives
Warrior Island Links